Grip style: Interlockinginterlock grip Hand position: NeutralNeutral grip Putt style: Long putter
    Long putter grip

    David Hearn Grip
    There are a lot of great looking swings on the PGA TOUR. Yet today’s game is surprisingly short on players sporting classic grips. David Hearn’s grip is the exception.

    Hearn, a Canadian who turned pro in 2001, displays the rare neutral grip in a sea of strong holds. For any fan of textbook technique, it’s a breath of fresh air. Hearn’s left and right hands match up perfectly, the “V’s” formed by thumbs and forefingers aligned with the club’s handle and pointing to his chest.

    What’s so great about a neutral grip? Mainly, it allows you to swing the club on plane and release properly with no manipulation through the hitting zone. The neutral-grip golfer can also curve shots left or right by simply altering his stance, rather than making drastic grip or swing changes.

    So, why don’t more pros and amateurs adopt a neutral grip? Probably because a strong grip delivers more distance. Indeed, Hearn’s driving stats reveal a weakness in this department – he failed to reach a 280-yard average in 2013 and ’14, ranking near the bottom of the standings.

    He tends to make up for it on the greens, however. Wielding a long putter, Hearn’s grip is standard-issue. He places the handle against his chest with his left hand, while his right fingers and thumb gently clasp the putter’s midsection. Hearn ranked inside the tour’s top 45 for strokes gained putting from 2012-14, topping out at 14th.

    How will Hearn and his fellow long putters, including Adam Scott, adapt once “anchoring” is banned in 2016? That’s the million-dollar question.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip