Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Corey Pavin Vardon grip Hand Position: WeakCorey Pavin Weak grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Corey Pavin reverse overlap grip

    Corey Pavin Grip
    Corey Pavin’s grip puts him in rare but legendary company.

    The “Gritty Little Bruin” from UCLA holds the golf club in a decidedly weak fashion. While a very small percentage of 21st century pros share Pavin’s style – Kevin Stadler and Pablo Larrazabal among them – it should look familiar to anyone who’s studied the great Ben Hogan. (And legions of golfers, teachers and tour pros have studied Ben Hogan.)

    Pavin’s left hand is rotated so far to his left, the wrist actually bows toward the target at address. This contrasts starkly with the cupped wrist of strong grippers. Pavin’s right hand is closer to neutral, with the “V” (where thumb meets index finger) aligned approximately with the club’s shaft.

    What’s amazing about Pavin’s grip is that he stuck with it for so long. Weighing just 155 pounds (if that), Pavin has spent his career watching other pros drive the ball 20, 30 and even 50 yards past him on a regular basis. A stronger grip might have closed the gap, at least a little.

    Then again, a grip change might have cost Pavin some of his accuracy and remarkable shotmaking ability. Who’s going to argue with 15 PGA TOUR wins, including the 1995 U.S. Open?

    His putting certainly didn’t hurt. Corey Pavin’s grip with his trusty Bulls Eye putter is a variation on his full-swing hold. His left hand is weak, but the right hand is in a strong position – turned well to the right, with the palm somewhat underneath the handle.

    Another oddity: Pavin places his left thumb not on the club’s grip, but on top of the fingers on his right hand. Hey, the “Gritty Little Bruin” has always done things his own way.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip