Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Chris Wood Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralChris Wood Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Chris Wood reverse overlap grip

    Chris Wood Grip
    It was a familiar story: English golf prodigy claims top 5 finish at the Open Championship as an amateur, turns pro and… Nothing much happens. Justin Rose lived it first. Then Chris Wood followed his footsteps.

    To be sure, Wood’s early days as a pro weren’t nearly as abysmal as Rose’s. Wood authored several near-misses on the European Tour, finally breaking through for his maiden victory in 2013.

    Enough of the backstory. Let’s look at Chris Wood’s grip.

    At 6’6”, Wood is well built with a big set of hands. His grip is unremarkable, which is a good thing – it’s nice and neutral, making it easy to get the club on plane and play a variety of shots.

    There is one interesting note about Wood’s grip that you may find helpful. As a junior, Wood’s hands would often slip off the club during his takeaway, which he attributes to a pronounced forward press. To solve the problem, his coach affixed double-sided tape to his grips for practice, which prevented Wood’s hands from moving off the club while he pounded hundreds of range balls. Eventually, his hands “learned” not to let go.

    Wood eliminated the forward press as well, though he occasionally revisits the tape drill to reinforce his hands’ “memory.”

    When putting, Chris Wood’s grip is standard issue – left hand above the right, left forefinger stretched across the right fingers in the reverse-overlap style. His hands do appear slightly less unified than many pros’, however. This hold may invite added wrist action, but it can also enhance one’s feel.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip