Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Vardon grip Hand position: strongstrong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    reverse overlap grip

    Chris Stroud Grip
    Chris Stroud’s grip is identifiable by a right hand “V” (at the base of thumb and forefinger) that points directly up his right arm at address, and by a left hand with a distinct angle at the wrist.

    In other words, it’s pretty strong – and barely distinguishable from the grips of his PGA TOUR peers.

    True, not every 21st century pro uses a strong grip. But the majority do, including such stalwarts as Bubba Watson, Billy Horschel and Brooks Koepka.

    The main advantage of a strong grip is added distance, especially with the driver. Yet Stroud doesn’t seem to enjoy much of a boost, if any. Despite his 6’2”, 180-pound frame, he typically ranks outside the tour’s top 100 in driving average. His accuracy stats are somewhat better, though far from great.

    So, how does the Texan manage to compete with the world’s best players? By cashing in his opportunities on the greens.

    Chris Stroud’s grip, putting version, has actually changed over the years. At one time, he went to a cross handed grip with a belly putter. However, 2014 found him using a standard reverse-overlap method with a regulation length putter, and it worked quite well. Stroud was seventh on tour in putts per green in regulation, propelling him to 10th in average birdies per round.

    With his hands in neutral positions, Stroud lays his left hand index finger over his right little finger, a minor deviation from the norm. (Typically, the left forefinger covers two or three fingers on the right hand). This may prevent his hands from becoming rigid and short-circuiting his feel – try it if you struggle with your pace on longer putts.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip