Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Charley Hoffman Vardon grip Hand position: strongCharley Hoffman strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Charley Hoffman reverse overlap grip

    Charley Hoffman Grip
    He may have finally cut his hair, but Charley Hoffman’s grip remains the same.

    The free-spirited Californian, long known for his 1980s-style “mullet” hairdo, chopped off his flowing locks in 2013. Maybe now fans will pay more attention to his terrific ball-striking.

    It all starts, as many modern swings do, with a strong left hand grip. Hoffman’s is rotated so far to his right that the back of his left forearm faces forward at address; the “V” at the base of his left thumb and index finger traces a line to his right shoulder.

    Hoffman’s right hand, while technically strong, is closer to a neutral position than his left – the “V” points toward his right collarbone. Hoffman isn’t alone in mixing grip positions. Angel Cabrera and Ben Crane are among those with similar holds.

    A relatively long hitter with decent accuracy, Hoffman has won three PGA TOUR events since 2007. He’s a streaky putter whose hot weeks typically find him on the leaderboard.

    With the flat-stick, Charley Hoffman’s grip is a tour-tested reverse overlap. His hands fold naturally onto the handle, with the left and right palms directly facing each other as though squeezing a ruler.

    More noteworthy is Hoffman’s putting routine. Once he’s over the ball, Hoffman takes his grip, looks once at the cup, looks back to the ball and immediately starts his stroke. It’s a method espoused by putting guru Dave Stockton with the goal of eliminating mind-cluttering thoughts.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip