Grip style: InterlockingBubba Watson interlock grip Hand position: Very strongBubba Watson strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
Bubba Watson reverse overlap grip

Bubba Watson
It’s hardly surprising to see Bubba Watson grip the golf club in an unconventional manner. When it comes to the left-handed, pink-loving two-time Masters winner, the rules simply don’t apply.

Watson’s grip style, the interlocking method, isn’t unusual. Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy Grip the same way. It’s Watson’s hand placement that’s so unorthodox. He turns his giant mitts well to the left (away from the target) on the handle into an extremely “strong” position. Only a few pros, including Fred Couples, grip the club in a similar manner.

How does Bubba Watson get away with a hand position that would cause most players to hit massive hooks? It starts with the grips themselves. To prevent overactive hands, he uses extra-thick grips. Plus, his grips are specially installed to keep the clubface open at address.

In other words, Watson’s equipment helps offset the effects of his off-neutral grip. This minimizes the need for major swing compensations, letting Watson do what comes naturally.

When he reaches the green—usually after a mammoth drive and a wedge shot Bubba Watson grip with the putter is actually pretty standard. He uses a basic reverse overlap style, with the hands a little to the strong side. He holds the putter very lightly, which enhances his touch and feel.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip