Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Brendon de Jonge Grip Vardon grip Hand position: NeutralBrendon de Jonge Grip Neutral grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutral
    Brendon de Jonge Grip reverse overlap grip

    Brendon de Jonge Grip
    He’s easily recognized as a 6’0”, 230-pound professional golfer with a bald head and a goatee. Brendon de Jonge’s grip stands out, too.

    So-called “mixed” grips, which combine elements of strong, weak and neutral positions, aren’t all that uncommon on the PGA TOUR. Thomas Bjorn and Angel Cabrera – both of whom mix a strong left hand with a neutral right – offer well-known examples. Few if any pros, however, exhibit a neutral left hand with a very weak right, a la de Jonge.

    De Jonge’s left hand position isn’t unusual by itself. The back of his hand is nearly square to the target line in classic neutral fashion. But the right hand, well, that’s a different story. The “V” formed by de Jonge’s right thumb and forefinger points to the left of his sternum. Contrast that with a neutral right hand, where the “V” aligns with the handle, or the oft-seen-on-tour strong position, with “V” aimed at the right shoulder.

    Obviously, de Jonge is doing something right. While he has yet to claim a tour victory as of early 2015, he compiled double-digit top-10 finishes each year from 2010-13.

    How does he putt? About average for a pro. On the greens, Brendon de Jonge’s grip is pretty standard except for the large angle between the back of his left hand and wrist. This is due in part because he sets up with his hands directly aligned with the ball, rather than pressed slightly toward the target.

    The idea is to maintain this cocked position throughout the stroke, limiting wrist motion as much as possible.

Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip