Grip style: Vardon (overlapping)Brandt Snedeker Vardon grip Hand position: strongBrandt Snedeker strong grip Putting grip style / hand position: Reverse overlap / neutralBrandt Snedeker reverse overlap grip

    Brandt Snedeker Grip
    Here’s something you don’t see every day: Brandt Snedeker’s grip starts with his right thumb removed from the handle. Not until he’s dragged the club back well away from the ball does Snedeker’s thumb return to its rightful spot.

    Why does Snedeker do this? Possibly as a check on the right hand, which can become overly active on the downswing and cause massive hooks. Indeed, Snedeker’s strong grip makes this a definite possibility. The move may also have the opposite intention. Releasing pressure from the right hand can allow the player to freely rotate the club through the shot, preventing the dreaded “block” that’s the bane of better golfers.

    Whatever the reason, this little quirk clearly works for Snedeker. Though his game slipped a bit in 2014, the Vanderbilt University alum has established himself as a consistent contender on the PGA TOUR.

    Of course, Snedeker’s green work gets much of the credit for his star status.

    With the putter, Brandt Snedeker’s grip is a model of simplicity. He drapes the left forefinger across the pinky, ring and middle fingers of his right hand to firmly unify his mitts. The palms are directly square to each other in a mildly strong position.

    This simple grip is the basis for Snedeker’s wickedly effective “pop” stroke. He led the tour in “strokes gained putting” in 2012, gaining fame for a short, accelerating action of remarkable efficiency.

    On the tee or on the greens, Snedeker’s grip gets a thumbs-up.


Golf Grip Terms
Note: All descriptions are for right-handed golfers.

Vardon / Overlapping Grip: Method of holding the club by placing the right pinky finger on top of the crease between the left index and middle fingers. Named for British golf legend Harry Vardon.
Interlocking Grip: Method of holding the club by wedging or locking the right pinky finger between the left index and middle fingers.
vardon grip interlocking grip
Neutral: Position in which the hands are directly aligned with the clubface. The golfer with a neutral grip can typically see two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Weak: Position in which the hands are rotated left (toward the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a weak grip can typically see one full knuckle on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
neutral grip weak grip
Strong: Position in which the hands are rotated right (away from the target) on the club’s handle. The golfer with a strong grip can typically see more than two full knuckles on the back of the left hand when addressing the ball.
Reverse Overlap Putting Grip: Conventional putting grip style with the left hand above the right and the left index finger extending downward, on top of the fingers of the right hand.
strong grip reverse overlap
Cross-Handed / Left Hand Low Putting Grip: The right hand is placed at the top of the handle, above the left hand, the opposite of a conventional grip.
Claw Putting Grip: The left hand is placed in the conventional position, at the top of the handle, with the right hand lower on the handle and holding the club between the thumb (on the grip’s underside) and fingers.
cross handed Claw Grip